Roman remains

Neolithic henge and Roman horse head excavated in Cornwall

Archaeologists in Cornwall have been excavating a 5,000-year-old henge site in Cornwall – the first uncovered in nearly 50 years in the county.The earthwork henge in St Newlyn East was first identified from the air as a marking in a field of crops – now the Cornwall Archaeology Society is finding out more about the ancient ceremonial site. While digging, the team also turned up Roman-age remains, including pottery and a horse’s head. The latter is an unusual discovery for two reasons – Cornwall’s acid soil usually means such items aren’t well preserved, and the Romans never had a hold on Cornwall. However, ideas about the Roman influence in Cornwall are being re-thought after the second ever fort in the county was confirmed to be Roman, near Restormel Castle earlier in 2007.

Ancient remains found at Budapest construction site

Part of a medieval cemetery and remains of Roman-era houses have been unearthed in Budapest’s District XI at the site of the recently-demolished Budai Skála shopping center, reports ingatlanmagazin.com. Most of the findings date back to the 1st and 2nd centuries, A.D., but some remnants, including fireplace fragments, are probably from a 1st century, B.C., settlement of Celts.Previous archeological surveys have determined that a Celtic-Roman settlement was located in the flats south of Gellért Hill (Gellérthegy), with finds in the area of Gellért tér, Ménesi utca, Móricz Zsigmond körtér and Kende utca. But the recently unearthed artifacts are thought to belong to a different, unrelated settlement.Archaeologists working at the construction site have also found minor artifacts from the New Stone Age, the Copper Age and the Bronze Age.The current archaeological digs will not impact construction of the new mall that will replace the Budai Skála. Archaeologists can continue digging on the site until demolition of the former shopping center is completed in October.

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